App update

From later this week, the Coffee with the King app will no longer be available from the App Store / Google Play. As far as I understand, if you’ve already got it, you can still use it. But you’ll lose it when you get a new phone/tablet or upgrade your phone’s operating system.

Given the recent fall in the Aussie dollar and the end of the first-year sweetheart deal from my provider, the annual cost was approaching 1000 AUD, so it simply wasn’t viable. Sorry to the 30 people who voted saying they wanted it to continue, but a 100% price rise wasn’t expected!

But you can make your own “bookmark” app – just by making a direct link to today’s reading on your phone/tablet’s home screen:

iPhone/iPad instructions (or see the generic how-to video here)

  1. Open the Safari web browser and go to
    www.coffeewiththeking.org
     . 6Yn8V
  2. Press the share button at the bottom of the screen (pictured, right).
  3. Select “Add to Home Screen”. This will create an icon on your home screen that will take you to today’s Coffee with the King. With one fewer press than the app.

Android instructions

You probably already know, because you’re an Android user. But just for the sake of completeness, and to spare the feelings of iOS users:

  1. Open your web browser and go to www.coffeewiththeking.org .
  2. Native Android browser, press “more” (top right). If you’re using Chrome, press the three dots at top right.
  3. Select “Add shortcut on home screen” (native) or “Add to home screen” (Chrome). This will create an icon on your home screen that will take you to today’s Coffee with the King. With one fewer press than the app.

Esther – part 1

This week, we’re going to take a look at the OT book of Esther. A book that Christians often ignore. Some of you, I’m guessing, might never have heard a sermon on Esther. Yet among the Jewish people, it’s one of the most popular stories. They read it out loud each year at the feast of Purim, a feast commemorating the events of this book.

(In fact, whenever Esther is read at the feast of Purim, every time the arch villain of the story is mentioned, the audience makes disparaging noises. A bit like a bad pantomime. Or if an Australian prime minister turns up to a sporting event. So whenever you read the name ‘Haman’ later in the story – he’s the bad guy – if you really want to get into the spirit of it, you need to boo and hiss. Maybe in your head, if you’re reading this on public transport. )

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