Titus 3:6-15

This is our final day looking at Paul’s letter to Titus. It follows on directly from yesterday (Titus 3:1-5) when Paul reminds us to live as model citizens of our world, interacting with the wider society considerately and gently – after all, it’s only by God’s mercy that we’ve been saved from their hopeless state before God. This salvation was entirely the work of God, not deserved by us, and brought about by the cleansing of the Holy Spirit – a spiritual “rebirth and renewal.” This Spirit, says Paul, is the one:

Titus 3:6 whom he poured out on us generously through Jesus Christ our Savior,

Continue reading

Titus 3:1-5

We move to the third and final chapter of Paul’s letter to Titus. Again, we find Paul giving some instruction to Titus about the kind of behaviour he was to teach, followed by a theological reason/motivation for it. The “behaviour” section is straightforward enough, and it focuses on how believers relate to the wider world:

Titus 3:1-2 Remind the people to be subject to rulers and authorities, to be obedient, to be ready to do whatever is good, 2 to slander no one, to be peaceable and considerate, and always to be gentle toward everyone.

Continue reading

Titus 2:11-15

We’re continuing our series in the letter of Paul to Titus. Thus far, there’s been a lot of instruction about the character of the people Titus appoints to be elders, and the kind of behaviour he should teach and model to various groupings within the church. Today, we change gear and talk about the reason for the moral teaching we’ve read thus far:

Continue reading

Titus 2:1-10 (part three)

We’re continuing our series in the epistle of Paul to Titus. Over the past two days, we saw Paul give instructions on what to teach the older men in the church on Crete, followed by the (more controversial) instructions concerning the teaching of women. But in both cases, the principle seems to have been: live out the values of your society in an exemplary fashion (insofar as they align with the values of God’s kingdom), but in a way that’s informed and motivated by your Christian faith. We now come to the two last categories in Paul’s list: younger men and slaves.

Continue reading

Titus 2:1-10 (part two)

We’re continuing our series in the epistle of Paul to Titus. Yesterday, we saw Paul give instructions on what to teach the older men in the church on Crete. Today, we move to the (more controversial) instructions concerning the teaching of women. (You need to have read yesterday’s post for today’s to make sense.) Let’s refresh our memory of the first part of this passage:

Continue reading

Titus 2:1-10 (part one)

We’re continuing our series in the epistle of Paul to Titus, who was left on the island of Crete to appoint elders and instruct/model how to teach sound doctrine and godly behaviour. In chapter 1, we saw how elders were to be of good character (in order to model right behaviour) with the ability to teach and defend truth – in contrast with the false teachers, whose self-serving behaviour undermined their message. In chapter 2, Paul gives some instructions on how Titus and the elders are to carry out this teaching:

Continue reading

Titus 1:10-16

We continue our series in the book of Titus. Last week, we looked at the character traits of the elders Titus was to appoint on the island of Crete. This week, we see the opposite: what the false teachers are like, from whom Titus must protect the church.

Titus 1:10-16 For there are many rebellious people, full of meaningless talk and deception, especially those of the circumcision group. 11 They must be silenced, because they are disrupting whole households by teaching things they ought not to teach—and that for the sake of dishonest gain. 12 One of Crete’s own prophets has said it: “Cretans are always liars, evil brutes, lazy gluttons.” 13 This saying is true. Therefore rebuke them sharply, so that they will be sound in the faith 14 and will pay no attention to Jewish myths or to the merely human commands of those who reject the truth. 15 To the pure, all things are pure, but to those who are corrupted and do not believe, nothing is pure. In fact, both their minds and consciences are corrupted. 16 They claim to know God, but by their actions they deny him. They are detestable, disobedient and unfit for doing anything good.

Continue reading

Titus 1:4-9 (part three)

We continue in our series in Titus. Over the past two days we’ve been sorting out the worms that jumped out of the can when we read about the characteristics of elders in Titus 1:5-9. The final part of that passage is important, but probably a bit less controversial.

Titus 1:8-9  Rather, he must be hospitable, one who loves what is good, who is self-controlled, upright, holy and disciplined. 9 He must hold firmly to the trustworthy message as it has been taught, so that he can encourage others by sound doctrine and refute those who oppose it.

Continue reading

Titus 1:5-9 (part two)

We continue in our series in Titus. Yesterday, we opened up a can of worms by looking at the characteristics of elders in Titus 1:5-9. We looked at a few of the worms, but there are still plenty more left today.  But first, read the text again to remind yourself of what we’re discussing:

Titus 1:5-9 The reason I left you in Crete was that you might put in order what was left unfinished and appoint elders in every town, as I directed you. 6 An elder must be blameless, faithful to his wife, a man whose children believe and are not open to the charge of being wild and disobedient. 7 Since an overseer manages God’s household, he must be blameless—not overbearing, not quick-tempered, not given to drunkenness, not violent, not pursuing dishonest gain. 8 Rather, he must be hospitable, one who loves what is good, who is self-controlled, upright, holy and disciplined. 9 He must hold firmly to the trustworthy message as it has been taught, so that he can encourage others by sound doctrine and refute those who oppose it.

Continue reading